Category: Editorial

Radio Station v. 2.2.7

2.2.7

  • Dutch translation added (Thank you to André Dortmont for the file!)
  • Added Tabbed Display for Master Schedule Shortcode (via Tutorial)
  • Add Show list columns with active, shift, DJs and show image displays
  • Add Schedule Override list columns with date sorting and filtering
  • Add playlist track information labels to Now Playing Widget
  • Added meridiem (am/pm) translations via WP Locale class
  • Added star rating link to plugin announcement box
  • Added update subscription form to plugin Help page
  • Fix to checkbox value saving for On Air/Upcoming Widgets
  • Fix 12 hour show time display in Upcoming Widget
  • Fix PM 12 hour shot time display in On Air Widget
  • Fix to schedule override date picker value visibility
  • Fix to weekday and month translations to use WP Locale
  • Fix to checkbox value saving in Upcoming Widget
  • Split Plugin Admin Functions into separate file
  • Split Post Type Admin Functions into separate include
  • Revert anonymous function use in widget registrations

Radio Station is a free, open-source plugin licensed under the GPL. Submit pull requests on Github.

If you love this plugin, please consider becoming a patron.

Introducing Radio Station by Netmix

In December of 1996, Netmix.com first appeared online as the world’s first DJ mix-show website hosting streaming mixes by the world’s most sought after DJs. In the March 20, 1996 issue of Billboard Magazine, Netmix was cited by former Dance Trax columnist, Larry Flick, as the “innovation and advancement of dance music on the Internet.”

Born out of my bedroom in a four-story walk up at 726 Washington Street, just outside of Washington Square in Brookline, MA, I would move Netmix from Boston to New York City in September of 1996 to partner with a dance music promotion company, with the goal of converging promotion and marketing with online streaming and distribution. While the partnership didn’t work out in the long run, Netmix survived in the dotcom 1.0 economy until it entered a purchase and sale agreement on June 1, 2000 with Polyverse, a youth-culture startup funded by investors in the gold rush of the early Internet era, which saw companies like CDNOW, MP3.com, and Psuedo Networks valued in the many hundreds of millions of dollars.

While I was negotiating with Polyverse, the Internet bubble started to burst. Fast forward to October of 2000 and Polyverse was out of cash. No one could raise money. The doors closed on new capital and thousands of startups on both coasts and around the world failed. It was, in no uncertain terms, one of the most difficult periods for founders and employees of these companies who saw their hopes and dreams fall apart when the Internet economy collapsed.

Over the next 19-years, I would hold onto the Netmix.com domain and keep the website active. In the late 2000s I launched the Netmix Global House Sessions Podcast, which is still ingrained into this site today (and for the foreseeable future). The podcast features my alter ego, DJ Tony Z, in the mix. But Netmix became a side hobby while I focused on working for various corporations and startups in New York City until 2010, when I asked my wife to move to Chapel Hill, NC for a job at the University of North Carolina.

In North Carolina for 9-years now, we skipped across the state; from Chapel Hill to Winston-Salem and now Asheville, NC. My wife and I adopted a baby boy at birth who was born in the Asheville area. My family became the priority while I also ran my WordPress consulting company, Digital Strategy Works. I had ideas for Netmix, but life’s priorities simply got in the way.

A few years ago, I got it in mind to host a radio mix-show on a Low Power FM here in Asheville, AshevilleFM. My friend, Phillip and I created the Asheville House Music Society and hosted the show on the station for about a year, but we had to put the show on hiatus. In September of 2018, we brought the show back on the air on another LPFM in Asheville, WPVMFM.org, where I volunteer as the station’s webmaster. While working on the station’s website, I noticed they were using a WordPress plugin, Radio Station, which was originally created by a developer in Colorado, Nikki Blight. The plugin hadn’t been updated on the site in a while, so I checked in on the WordPress codex to review the plugin and its status. When I learned Nikki was no longer actively developing the plugin and saw that there was an installed user base, I contacted her to inquire about it and let her know that I’d consider taking it over.

After a brief conversation, Nikki passed along the car keys to the plugin in early June (2019) and wished me luck. After 16-years of working with WordPress, I am now an official manager and committer of a plugin listed in the WordPress repository. But, I’m not a developer myself. I’m a product manager and entrepreneur with deep experience managing WordPress projects, so I needed help bringing the plugin up to speed. I put the word out in the WordPress universe and the universe returned Tony Hayes, an experienced WordPress developer living about two-hours south of Brisbane, Australia. Tony’s work includes https://wpmedic.tech and other plugins that check on the health of WordPress websites.

For the past three months, Tony and I have been working together on the open-source, free version of the plugin. We’ve also had a contribution from another developer working at a radio station in Virginia, who helped bring the plugin up to WordPress coding standards. We’ve made some improvements to the plugin and are actively working on building a PRO version with an audio player, time zone switcher, and a few other neat features. But for now, we’re tightening up the plugin and its core feature set.

We’re also looking at integrating the plugin with a few popular radio station automation software packages, like AirTime and LibreTime.

After 19-years of controlling the Netmix domain name and website, I decided on merging Radio Station with Netmix, which is why the plugin is now hosted here on this site and it will carry the Netmix brand going forward, along with all the bells and whistles we hope to add to it.

We’re always looking for contributions from the community. If you’d like to join in the fun, please do visit the Radio Station project on Github and take a stab at fixing something or adding something, then issuing a pull request. We’d love to get contributions from the radio station community supporting open-source projects.

I’m so excited I finally found and merged a worthy WordPress project with the Netmix brand. Over the next couple of months, you’ll see some changes to this website. It’s a work in progress and slow going, but we’re committed to advancing the plugin, building out a PRO version with additional awesome features, and figuring it all out as we go along. We’d love to know what you think of the plugin, so leave a comment on this post below. And, please do share this plugin in your networks, so we can grow participation and installs – that’s how this is going to succeed.

8tracks: The Disco Fries Pumpkin Spice Playlist

Our dear friends over at 8tracks.com have been kicking it lately with featured mixes by hot DJ producers. This week, they’re launching a new mix from the break out American production team, The Disco Fries.

Sprinkled with salt and smothered with ketchup, this The Disco Fries playlist is the perfect end of summer jam session. Lot’s of fun records in the mix, but given the DMCA restrictions on pre-announcing playlists, we can’t actually tell you what they are! I know, right? Well, that’s what we’re dealing with nowadays here on the interwebs, but that shouldn’t stop you from listening, exploring and discovering some fresh tunes just out of The Disco Fries kitchen. We will say there is one serious smackdown of a remix. Check the “Won’t Look Back” [Disco Fries & Aylen Remix]. The original artist is one of our favorites, Duke Dumont.  This is a huge record and the The Disco Fries give it an amped up treatment. They’ve sped up the original vocals a bit, but it all works in the context of their remix of this now classic deep house tune. 

The Disco Fries are Nick Ditri and Danny Boselovic. Known for their EDM tracks, original productions and remixes, the duo are burning up the radio airwaves and have a couple of #1 Billboard Dance Club Play remixes. They reworked records for Katy Perry and Foxes to Flo Rida and Cobra Starship. You can also hear three The Disco Fries produced tracks on Tiësto’s, A Town Called Paradise. They are “Wasted” featuring Matthew Koma, “Say Something,” and “Shimmer” featuring Christian Burns (production and writing credit). They’re also credited with co-writing and composing on Krewella Live For The Night along with the members of Cash Cash.

Some of the biggest names in EDM support The Disco Fries, including Tiesto, Hardwell, Kaskade, Steve Aoki, and Armand Van Helden. The Disco Fries are just getting ready serve up more hot potatoes from Nick Hexum (of 311), Breathe Carolina, Tiesto, Raine Maida (of Our Lady Peace) and a slew of other incredible writers and vocalists.

Oh, and you can grab some The Disco Fries merch from their online shop: https://www.fixtstore.com/thediscofries

In regards to their 8tracks playlist selection, here’s what Nick and Dani had to say: “We’re always looking to push ourselves to explore new sounds. We want to keep making music that we enjoy sharing with people and people enjoy hearing. The party never ends for us.”

Follow The Disco Fries on Twitter and Facebook.

Is the free U2 album download from iTunes really that big of a deal?

Image of U2 - Songs Of Innocence White Label LP
U2 – Songs Of Innocence White Label LP

Are there worse things in the world than getting a free album from one of the world’s greatest rock bands to ever walk the face of the planet? Yes.

There are plenty of things worse than iTunes pushing a free album download to your purchased music bin. You can get hit by a bus tomorrow. Someone can mug you. You can lose your job. You can get a divorce. Your 12-year old can storm out of the room screaming, “I HATE YOU!” You can get kidnapped by terrorists and killed for the whole world to see, in the middle of a desert, which is then broadcast on YouTube. No, I’m not making light of that last one. I’m saying that is one of the worst things that can befall anyone. It’s horrific. But while we’re all texting and driving and complaining about Apple pushing a free download to your iPhone and computer, horrible things are going on around the world that are far more important.

Okay, so it was an inconvenience for you. Sure, it sucked up some bandwidth on your mobile device. Sure, it wasn’t easily removed. You needed a tool that Apple quickly provided after the backlash to remove it from your library. Yes, it’s taking up some room you thought you had and now you don’t, which prevents you from downloading some other crap that you think you really wanted, but you actually didn’t and you’ll rarely ever play whatever that was anyway. It’s really not you that I’m targeting with this post. It’s the media who are drumming up drama to simply direct attention to them and not the fact that Apple spent $100M to give away millions of downloads of a fairly good album to its customers as a thank you.

Let’s just take a chill pill and relax. No one died. Bono was close to Steve Jobs. Remember, Bono convinced Jobs to make a red iPod for his global AIDS project. Getting a free U2 album should be no f**** surprise then. Let’s all take a deep breath now. Inhale. Exhale. Good.

Okay, so you don’t like Bono or U2. You love the throat singers from Tuvalu. You cringe when you hear a U2 song. Well, you’re in the minority. If U2 is offensive, then President Obama is Chinese. Right. U2 is not offensive and President Obama is not Chinese. Well, he’s a terrorist according to some Republicans you talk to, but that’s a story for another day.

Maybe Steve Jobs wouldn’t have pushed the album. He probably would have made it optional or done something else. Tim Cook is no Steve Jobs, but he’s no slouch either.

Can we just get over this U2 stuff today? Take a listen to the album. You might even like what you hear.

Apologies for Netmix Intermittent Outages

For the past few weeks, since we attempted to upgrade Netmix’s WordPress installation with W3 Total Cache, a caching plugin, as well as optimize our servers with NGINX and Varnish cache, we’ve experienced intermittent outages and the site was not available to users.

First, we thank you for your patience as we work through these issues, which we believe are 90% resolved.

Second, if you continue to experience outages, please let us know through out Twitter account: @netmix.

We hope we’ve seen the light at the end of the proverbial tunnel and that we’ve restored services satisfactorily. We continue to work to make sure our server infrastructure is tight.